Water Art: Flow

*Guest post by David Hayes.

water art

In this month’s article, I want to show you how I took an image I shot of water flowing into something more akin to a drawing or painting. To do this I used four different apps: SlowShutter, Formulas, VSCOcam, and Snapseed.

water art

Let’s start with how I obtained my source image that is featured above. Using the app SlowShutter, I established my shutter settings (A) so that the “Capture Mode” was Motion Blur and my Blur Strength at Maximum. I used several different Shutter Speeds of the same image and then picked the one I like the best. I also had my iPhone6 rigged to a tripod…that is a must!

water art

With this image saved to my Camera Roll, later that day I opened it in a brand new app called Formulas. After giving a number of the app’s formulas a try, I picked “Whitewashed”.

water art

Setting the opacity at 80% gave the image a nice monochromatic feel…more like the painterly look I was after.

water art

This in place, I saved to my Camera Roll and moved to the next step.

water art

I then opened the image in VSCOcam to take advantage of the great filters available in this pro quality app. “A8” in the “Minimalist” collection was my pick.

water art

Processed with VSCOcam with a8 preset

As before, I saved this version to my Camera Roll and moved on!

water art

If you have been a regular reader of my articles, you know how much I like to use Snapseed as my finishing app. This app has recently undergone a major update that has not only changed its user interface but add some nifty features along the way! So…I opened the image and clicked on the “pencil” icon in the right hand corner.

water art

In the “Tools” category I went for “Tune Image” first thing…as I always do!

water art

While the screen shot shows an adjustment to “Saturation” of 16%, I also adjusted the “Brightness” to -4 and “Contrast” to 52. Clicking on the icon in the right corner put all this into place.

water art

Whilst working with the “Tune Image” settings, I decided that I wanted to tighten up the crop a bit more so my next stop was “Crop”.

water art

Keeping the Aspect Ratio at “Free”, I moved the crop lines both in tighter as well as creating a diagonal line of the river plants from the bottom left corner to the top right corner. Again, I clicked on the lower right hand corner icon to put this into place.

water art

“Tonal Contrast” is one of the newer features to Snapseed and I wanted to give a try on this image.

water art

Once into the adjustment controls, I went with “High Tones” at 44% to help bring out the river plants.

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Liking the image as it stood, it was time to pick out a frame!

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I went with Frame Style #2…

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…with a Frame Width of -10. This gave a nice white frame that sets of the blacks and grays of the image.

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It was time for a final save. Snapseed now offers a “Save a copy” option that puts all your adjustments into place and saves this as a copy to your Camera Roll. If you pick “Save”, Snapseed replaces your source image with the new image. Just something to keep in mind….

water art

Processed with VSCOcam with a8 preset

Here’s the final version of Flow.

If you’d like to see more of this art, visit my blog: www.clearerreflections.com

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