Wax and Paper Workshop Bonus Content

Welcome to the Wax and Paper Workshop Bonus Page! First, a little about the book:

You’ll Love This Book If:

  • You love to work with encaustic paint
  • You want to try nontraditional surface for encaustic painting
  • You’re looking for tips on making handmade paper perfect for encaustic painting

Explore how to work with paper and wax in new, interesting & innovative ways with the latest title from Michelle Belto. If you’re a paper enthusiast, a mixed media enthusiast or both Wax and Paper Workshop will show you mixed media tips & tricks that will take your art to the next level.

Wax and Paper Workshop includes more than 20 step-by-step demonstrations showing you everything you need to know about working with encaustic paint and paper. This combination of several mixed-media elements will appeal to a wide range of mixed media artists and give you the freedom to express your own artistic voice. This encaustic painting book is great for intermediate artists looking to experiment & refine their encaustic talents.

In Wax and Paper Workshop You’ll Learn:

  • How to work with commercial paper when encaustic painting
  • How to prepare paper substrates for wax
  • Basic techniques for painting with encaustic paint & other mixed media materials

About Michelle Belto:

Michelle Belto’s work as a presenter, artist and teacher spans more than thirty years, three continents and thirteen publications. She is on the board or a member of several encaustic organizations including International Encaustic Artists and Texas Wax. She will be an instructor at 2012’s Encausticamp – a retreat organized by Encaustic Workshop author, Patricia Baldwin-Seggebruch. She was the 2009 Creative Capital Grant recipient from the City of San Antonio Cultural Arts and she is also an adjunct faculty member at the Southwest School of Art where she continues her post-graduate work. You can learn more about Michelle’s art by visiting her website: MichelleBelto.com.

On this bonus page, you’ll find:

  • A bonus technique  – how to embed a photo into an encaustic piece  – fully stepped out with photos and text
  • A gallery of original art pieces by Michelle
  • A video field trip that will give you a bit of insight into the joyousness that is Michelle Belto and will open up your eyes to unconventional materials and tools
  • A gallery of photos culled from our video field trip

Embedding a Photo in Wax:

Step 1: Lay your photo on a sheet of paper

Step 1: Lay your photo on a sheet of paper.

STEP 1

Place your photo (a copy is fine) on a sheet of wet, freshly made paper. In this photo, the paper is still on the mould.

Step 2: Using a dip mold, make a new piece of paper.

Step 2: Using a dip mould, make a new piece of paper.

STEP 2

Using a dip mould, form a new (very thin!) sheet of paper.

Step 3: Lift off some of the paper pulp from the fresh, wet paper.

Step 3: Lift off some of the paper pulp from the fresh, wet paper.

STEP 3

Lift some of the pulp off the mould before the paper has a chance to dry. You will do this strategically so that parts of your photo show through the areas where the paper has been removed.

STEP 4: Invert the mould.

STEP 4: Invert the mould.

STEP 4

Invert the mould and place the new sheet over the sheet of paper that holds the photo. Do not remove the mould.

Step 5: Sponge out excess water.

Step 5: Sponge out excess water.

STEP 5

Use a sponge to remove excess water from your paper. Press gently with the sponge on the screening of your mould, drawing water up. Wring out water and repeat until you feel you’ve removed as much of the water as possible (The paper beneath the screen should still be damp).

Step 6: Lift the mould off the paper.

Step 6: Lift the mould off the paper.

STEP 6

Carefully lift the mould off the paper.

Step 7: Remove or add pulp as desired, and allow the paper to dry.

Step 7: Remove or add pulp as desired, and allow the paper to dry.

STEP 7

Remove or add pulp to further reveal or obscure your photo as desired. Allow the paper to dry completely.

Step 8: Place your embedded paper over a foam core substrate.

Step 8: Place your embedded paper over a foam core support.

Step 8

Place your dried paper with your photo embedded in it on top of a support such as a piece of foam core. The foam core should be about one inch shorter on each side than your paper. (This photo also does a good job of illustrating what the paper will look like when it is dry.)

Step 9: Apply PVA glue to the edges of your paper.

Step 9: Apply PVA glue to the edges of your paper.

STEP 9

Apply PVA glue to the edges of your paper.

Step 10: Wrap the edges of the paper around the back of the foam core.

Step 10: Wrap the edges of the paper around the back of the foam core.

STEP 10

Wrap the edges of the paper around the back of the foam core to secure. The wrapping will be smoother and neater if you wrap the corners first and then the sides. Allow the glue and paper to dry completely. Be sure not to wrap the paper too tightly around your support – the paper could shrink a bit as the glue dries.

Step 11: Spray paper with ink or paint.

Step 11: Spray paper with ink or paint.

STEP 11

Spray paper with paint or ink colors of your choice. In this project I’m using a bit of concentrated liquid watercolor dispersed in a spray bottle of water. Use the paint to highlight around your main focal image, your photo. Allow the paint to dry completely.

Step 12: Brush a layer of wax over the surface of the painted paper.

Step 12: Brush a layer of wax medium over the surface of the painted paper.

STEP 12

Brush a layer or two of wax medium over the entire surface. Allow the wax to cool completely.

Step 13: Apply pigment to select areas of the piece.

Step 13: Apply pigment to select areas of the piece.

STEP 13

Use pigment sticks to apply color to the waxy surface in select areas, and with a gloved hand, distribute the oil stick wherever you want it. Be sure to press it into any cracks and indentations.

In this photo I’m using oil stick that contain linseed oil. Linseed oil is highly flammable and rags soaked with linseed oil should be placed in a metal can with a lid and disposed of properly. Oil sticks should never be used around an open flame, and gloves should be worn any time you use oil sticks – to ensure that pigment particles cannot enter the body through any abrasions you may have on your hands.

 

Step 14: Remove some of the pigment from the surface.

Step 14: Remove some of the pigment from the surface.

STEP 14

Use a paper towel or soft cloth to remove excess oil pigment/color from the surface. Remove as much or as little as you desire. If you want the oil to remain only in the crevices, you may want add a little cooking oil, linseed oil or petroleum jelly to a cloth and lightly rub or buff the surface, or use a blender stick, as shown here.

Step 17

Step 15: Add another layer of medium.

STEP 15

Add another layer of medium to the piece to seal all work, including color, into the piece.

STEP 17

Step 16: Fuse the layers together.

STEP 16

Fuse this layer of medium to the others.

Step 18

Step 17: Fuse layers.

STEP 17

Using a piece of nylon pantyhose, lightly buff the surface of the entire piece. Doing this will bring greater shine and dimension to the piece.

Step 18

Step 18: Scrape back some of the wax.

STEP 18

Scrape back wax in select areas. This can be done to reveal more of the photo’s focal point or to add dimension.

Step 19

Step 19: Add pigment powder as desired.

STEP 19

Using your finger, add a little pigment powder to highlight desired areas of the piece, especially textural high points.

More by Michelle Belto:

Daggers

Daggers

Balance

Balance

Minefield

I Spy

I Spy

Honeycomb

Honeycomb

 Video Field Trip:

Field Trip Photos:

Incising?

Michelle likes the idea of using nails, like these, for incising into the wax.

Embedding?

Michelle thinks this loose grass seed could be used for embedding – either into the paper during the papermaking process or between layers of wax.

And action!

Michelle and the F+W video team in the middle of the action.

Texture?

Michelle is considering the possibilities – this rope could be used to add texture to a layer of wax, or it could be embedded in handmade paper.

Find of the day!

Like a kid in a candy shop! Michelle is excited by the possibilities this piece of screening holds. We’re guessing it might add texture to both paper and wax!

Check out!

Time to check out and say goodbye. (Wow, that screening – can’t imagine that will be easy to pack for Michele’s flight home from Cincinnati!) Special thanks to Silverton Hardware, 7144 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati, OH. We couldn’t have it without you!

 

Enjoyed this page? You may also like:

Book Notes: Encaustic Mixed Media

Creating Encaustic Collages

Adhering Elements with Beeswax

Embedding natural Elements in Wax

Creating Textures with Encaustic

 

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