How to Use Watercolor Pencils: Color Theory, Mark Making and Blending

Journal Fodder 365, the new book by Eric M. Scott and David R. Modler (authors of the wildly popular The Journal Junkies Workshop), will be hitting stores in a matter of weeks! We think you'll find Journal Fodder 365 rich and packed full with excellent tutorials, prompts and inspiration. To whet your appetite, check out these exclusive tutorials with tips and advice on how to use watercolor pencils! The colored pencil techniques featured here are specific to watercolor pencils and in no time flat you will be using colored pencils in mark making and drawing and you'll also learn a bit about color theory and blending and mixing color. So let's get started! COLOR THEORY AND EXPLORING COLOR Because of its associations with moods and emotions, color is an obvious way to add meaningful visual elements. Be thoughtful and deliberate as you use color. What are the symbolic meanings of the colors that you use? What messages are you expressing through your choice of color? Are there colors that best represent you, your feelings, your dreams? Artists work with color schemes to give their work a sense of unity and to strengthen the visual message. Your choice of colors helps you express the real intention behind your words and images and allows you to be more thoughtful and to avoid random or odd mixes of colors. Explore your color schemes to find the combinations that fit your intention. Some examples:
Bright Colors

Bright Colors

Dull and Dark Colors

Dull and Dark Colors

Earth Tones

Earth Tones

Cool Colors

Cool Colors

Warm Colors

Warm Colors

Monochromatic Colors

Monochromatic Colors

MARK MAKING, HARD EDGES AND TONAL CHANGES  By using watercolor pencils you can quickly add additional color to your art journal pages. You can use color to explore line but you can also use it to add a variety of marks, shapes and textures. If you decide to use watercolor pencil to draw in some of your lines, you can use plain water to create interesting painterly effects. Specifically, experiment with creating hard edges and value change.
Step 1

Step 1

STEP 1: Choose a color with which you identify. It might be your favorite color, or it might be a color that you identify with a certain memory or person, or it might be a completely random color. Draw your lines onto your page, dividing it into several large shapes.
Step 2

Step 2

STEP 2: Reinforce your lines by shading and applying a lot of pigment. Don't be afraid to press hard. Allow one edge to be crisp and neat, and lighten your pressure to lighten the value.
Step 3

Step 3

STEP 3: Use clean water and paint the water over the watercolor pencil, spreading the color across a large section of the page. Be careful with how you paint the water, and pay attention to keeping that one edge crisp.
Step 4

Step 4

STEP 4: To fade the value of the color, dip your brush into more water. You might want to swirl your brush around to clean out any pigment. Paint more water onto the page, moving further away from the pigmented areas. Work quickly so the pigment doesn't have time to dry. BLENDING AND BURNISHING WITH COLORED PENCIL This watercolor pencil technique demonstration offers more on color, hue and tone, with a bit of gradation thrown in for good measure!
STEP 1

STEP 1

STEP 1: To use two values of colored pencil to create a value change, begin by shading from dark to light by lightening your pressure.
STEP 2

STEP 2

STEP 2: Use the other color and shade from dark to light in the opposite direction, allowing the new color to overlap the first color.
STEP 3

STEP 3

STEP 3: Use the first pencil to apply more color to cover the area already colored.
STEP 4

STEP 4

STEP 4: Repeat with the second color so the colors blend together, creating a smooth transition from one color to another. YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY THE FOLLOWING: Journal Fodder 365 Bonus Content Book Notes: Journal Junkies Workshop Altering Pages Tutorial Art Journaling Tutorial                

You may also like these articles:

This entry was posted in Art Journaling, Editor's Picks, Make: Mixed Media Art Projects and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply